Algeria Vacation Trips
Algeria History - Post-independence

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In 1954, the National Liberation Front launched the Algerian War of Independence which was a guerrilla campaign. By the end of the war, newly elected President Charles de Gaulle, understanding that the age of empires was ending, held a plebiscite, offering Algerians three options. In a famous speech de Gaulle proclaimed in front of a vast crowd of Pieds-Noirs "Je vous ai compris". Most Pieds-noirs then believed that de Gaulle meant that Algeria would remain French. The poll resulted in a landslide vote for complete independence from France. Over one million people, 10% of the population, then fled the country for France and in just a few months in mid-1962. These included most of the 1,025,000 Pieds-Noirs, as well as 81,000 Harkis. In the days preceding the bloody conflict, a group of Algerian Rebels opened fire on a marketplace in Oran killing numerous innocent civilians, mostly women. It is estimated that somewhere between 50,000 and 150,000 Harkis and their dependents were killed by the FLN or by lynch mobs in Algeria.

Algeria's first president was the FLN leader Ahmed Ben Bella. He was overthrown by his former ally and defence minister, Houari Boumédienne in 1965. Under Ben Bella the government had already become increasingly socialist and authoritarian, and this trend continued throughout Boumédienne's government. However, Boumédienne relied much more heavily on the army, and reduced the sole legal party to a merely symbolic role. Agriculture was collectivised, and a massive industrialization drive launched. Oil extraction facilities were nationalized. This was especially beneficial to the leadership after the 1973 oil crisis. However, the Algerian economy became increasingly dependent on oil which led to hardship when the price collapsed during the 1980s oil glut.

In foreign policy, while Algeria shares much of its history and cultural heritage with neighbouring Morocco, the two countries have had somewhat hostile relations with each other ever since Algeria's independence. Reasons for this include Morocco's disputed claim to portions of western Algeria, Algeria's support for the Polisario Front for its right to self-determination, and Algeria's hosting of Sahrawi refugees within its borders in the city of Tindouf.

Within Algeria, dissent was rarely tolerated, and the state's control over the media and the outlawing of political parties other than the FLN was cemented in the repressive constitution of 1976.

Boumédienne died in 1978, but the rule of his successor, Chadli Bendjedid, was little more open. The state took on a strongly bureaucratic character and corruption was widespread.

The modernization drive brought considerable demographic changes to Algeria. Village traditions underwent significant change as urbanization increased. New industries emerged and agricultural employment was substantially reduced. Education was extended nationwide, raising the literacy rate from less than 10% to over 60%. There was a dramatic increase in the fertility rate to 7–8 children per mother.

Therefore by 1980, there was a very youthful population and a housing crisis. The new generation struggled to relate to the cultural obsession with the war years and two conflicting protest movements developed: communists, including Berber identity movements; and Islamic 'intégristes'. Both groups protested against one-party rule but also clashed with each other in universities and on the streets during the 1980s. Mass protests from both camps in autumn 1988 forced Bendjedid to concede the end of one-party rule.

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Air Travel Rules: Traveling With Tools

Are you a handyman by trade? If so, it is likely that you have grown accustomed to carrying your tools around with you, wherever you go. In fact, there is also a chance that you may need to travel with them. Whether you are traveling for business purposes or not, it is important to know that the airline industry as a specific set of air travel rules concerning tools. If you are planning on brining your tools along with you, you will want to take the time to famialrize yourself with these rules. Doing so may prove helpful, in more ways than one. More travel tips about Air Travel Rules: Traveling With Tools


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Algeria History: Ancient history - Middle Ages - Arrival of Islam - Ottoman rule - French rule
Post-independence
:Algerian political events(1991-2002) - Post war

Algeria UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Algeria
Algeria Tourism
Algeria Tourist Attractions: Cirta - Al Qal'a of Beni Hammad - Belzma National Park - Algiers
Hammam Guergour - Mostaganem - The Tassili du Hoggar - Timgad - Hippone - The Aures - Tebessa
Kabyl coast - Tiemcen - Djemila - Kasbah of Algiers (1992) - M'Zab Valley (1982) - Tipaza (1982)

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